Tavistock Place, Camden (London)

The “Inspector’s Report on the Torrington Place to Tavistock Place Public Inquiry” was released on May 18 and is available here. Read more

Pedal & Post

Did you know that Oxford is home to one of the biggest “last-mile” cargo-bike logistics operations in the UK? Pedal & Post has 10 cargo-bikes covering the entirety of the city every day.

More than 25% of disabled commutes in Cambridge are by bike

Riding a bike may be easier than walking for two-thirds of disabled cyclists, but they often remain invisible to society. Many don’t realise that more than a quarter of disabled commutes in this university city are made by bike.

Read more

Fair-weather cycling?

Do people cycle in all seasons? In Copenhagen, pictured above, 75% of the city residents keep cycling through the winter months.

This study of Swedish households found active-travel commuters “to be much less sensitive to weather changes than non-commuters”.

There is even such a thing as a Winter Cycling Congress.

Stevenage’s unloved bike lanes

The UK town of Stevenage (pop 88,000) famously built miles of segregated cycleways in the 1960s … only to see them disused.

Carlton Reid tells the story.

Squint at Stevenage’s extensive 1960s protected cycleway network and you could be in the Netherlands – except for the lack of people on bikes. So why did the New Town’s residents choose the motor car over the bicycle?

Dronning Street in Copenhagen

Car space on Dronning Louises Bridge in Copenhagen was reduced to increase space for cycling, pedestrians, and buses. The result was an increase in cycling by 60%, walking by 165%, bus use by 5%, and increase from 81,000 to 97,000 using the bridge.

Source.

Motorised traffic journey times after space-reduction

London’s Cycle Superhighways (CSHs) offer one example of a reallocation of road space between cycles and cars. The graphs above and below indicate the impact on journey times for motorised traffic, as of November 2017. These are from Transport for London.

Journey times are certainly up. But for the first time, they are actually falling. This reflects in part traffic evaporation as commuters switch to other modes.

And keep in mind the overall increase in *people* being moved along these routes:

Recent monitoring data shows that central London segregated cycle lanes are moving five times more people per square metre than the main carriageway

– Transport for London, FOI request response

Oxford’s own Cherwell School is Number One!

Cherwell School in north Oxford has the best cycling modal share in the UK. The reason? It has a totally segregated cycle way to link it with student catchment areas.

From http://www.cherwell.oxon.sch.uk/information/school-travel

We are the number one cycling school in the UK! No other school has such a high proportion of students (58.4% and rising) who regularly come to school by bike. Our cycling rate is 20 times the national average. Cherwell has become a benchmark school, a model of good practice in promoting cycling. 15.7% travel by bus and 14.8% walk – adding up to a total of 88.9% who use sustainable means of travel. …

We strongly discourage dropping students off by car, unless there are special circumstances. Given the large volume of bicycles going in and out of the School, there is a risk of an accident – especially at the entrances to South Site and the Rugby Club car park.